Friday, July 12, 2019

This "Hairspray" Has Bounce and Shine

Hairspray


Cassie Grilley and Company Photo: Ben Krantz Studio

Music by Marc Shaiman, lyrics by Scott Wittman and Marc Shaiman, book by Mark O'Donnell and Thomas Meehan; based on the 1988 film of the same name by John Waters

Directed by Matthew McCoy

Bay Area Musicals
Victoria Theater, San Francisco

Until August 11, 2019

By Christine Okon

Long ago, my mother would take me to get a wash, set and styling for next to nothing at the local beauty school. The student would grab her can of Aqua Net hairspray as I squeezed my eyes shut and held my breath as the ssshhhh buzzed around my ears, and small sticky droplets hit my neck.  Hairspray was the essential, bubblegum fix for the instant glamour of beehives, bouffants, and big hair.

Bay Area Musicals (BAM) has launched a high-powered, fun show with the musical "Hairspray.”  Under the direction of Matthew McCoy, BAM performers, in any show they put on, always exude commitment and enthusiasm, and this show is no different.

"Hairspray," set in 1962 when times were about to be a-changin’, follows the sweet and “pleasingly plump” teenager Tracy Turnblad (a big-haired and bubbly Cassie Grilley) as she celebrates her life in Baltimore, “where every day is an open door,” and dreams of meeting and marrying Link Larkin, the handsomest dancer on the Corny Collins (a slippery and suave Scott Taylor-Cole) after school dance show. Tracy and her best friend Penny Pingleton (a remarkably versatile Melissa  Momboisse) squeal and wriggle as they watch the show on the small black and white television in the Turnblad living room. With her “radio and hairspray,” Tracy can take on the world, which indeed she does.

Dave J. Abrams and Company Photo: Ben Krantz Studio

This musical beats like the heart of a teenage girl dancing to songs, joys, challenges and triumphs. From beginning to end, the stage is full of action and surprises with dance numbers that keep on coming. You feel that sweet anticipation for the next 45 rpm to drop down the spindle rack and hit the turntable.

Jon Gallo and musicians adeptly travel the musical allusions that range from doo-wop, girl band, surf, and Trudy’s favorite: rhythm and blues and soul, which Corny Collins plays once a week on “Negro Day” when local black kids take the floor.  As lead dancer Seaweed J. Stubbs, Dave Abrams lights up the stage with his moves, flips and grinds in “Run and Tell That.”

Sarah Sloan and Lauren Meyer Photo: Ben Krantz Studi

When Tracy asks innocently why Negroes can’t dance every day with the white kids, she unveils the racism and snobbery of the show’s producer Velma Von Tussle (Sarah Sloan) who, with her equally vacuous and pink-chiffon-dressed daughter Amber (Lauren Meyer). will stop at nothing to do the white, er, right thing to protect the status quo. It’s as if she were using the show’s sponsor “Ultra-Clutch Hairspray” to keep flyaway hair, times, behavior, rules and mores in place.

Tracy’s eyes and consciousness are widened by Motormouth Maybelle (Elizabeth Jones), a “Big, Blonde and Beautiful” black woman in shimmering blue lame and sequins (cheers to costume designer Brooke Jennings). When Jones belts out “I Know Where I’ve Been,” I felt as if I were at a leap-to-your-feet church celebration.

Elizabeth Jones Photo: Ben Krantz


With “Welcome to the 60’s,” Tracy urges her mother Edna Turnblad, who has not left the house since 1951, to take chances. Scott DiLorenzo fills out Edna’s housedress adequately but needs to create a more convincing mother-daughter bond of affection.

Although the miking had problems opening night, BAM brings another fun night at the theater. When the audience leaps up to join the actors in the final number “You Can’t Stop the Beat,” everyone dances out the history lesson that teaches that for true change to happen, “just to sit still would be a sin.”

"Hairspray" by Marc Shaiman, Scott Wittman, Mark O'Donnell and Thomas Meehan, directed by Matthew McCoy of Bay Area Musicals at The Victoria Theatre, San Francisco, through Sunday, August 11, 2019. Info: bamsf.org

CAST
Cassie Grilley, Tracy Turnblad
Melissa Momboisse, Penny Pingleton
Scott DiLorenzo, Edna Turnblad
Kamren Mahaney, Link Larkin
Elizabeth Jones, Motormouth Maybelle
*Dave Abrams, Seaweed J. Stubbs
Kennedy Williams, Little Inez
Paul Plain, Wilbur Turnblad
Lauren Meyer, Amber Von Tussle
Sarah Sloan, Velma Von Tussle
Scott Taylor-Cole, Corny Collins
Bonnie Lafer, Prudy Pingleton/Others
Kim Larsen, Principal/Male Authority
Stephen Kanaski, Brad
Ronald James, Fender
Emma Sutherland, Brenda
Brendan Looney, Sketch
Claire Pearson, Tammy
Steven McCloud, I.Q.
Peli Naomi Woods, Detention Kid/Dynamite
Smita Patibanda, Detention Kid/Dynamite
Chanel Tilghman, Detention Kid/Dynamite
April Deutschle, Detention Kid
Carlos Carrillo, Detention Kid
Zoe Hodge, Detention Kid
Ajay Prater, Detention Kid

*Appears courtesy of Actor’s Equity Association   

ARTISTIC TEAM
Matthew McCoy, Director/Choreographer
Jon Gallo, Musical Director
Leslie Waggoner, Assnt. Choreographer
Cat Knight, Stage Manager
Andie Fanelli, Assnt. Stage Manager
Lynn Grant, Set Designer
Brooke Jennings, Costume Designer
Eric Johnson, Lighting Designer
Anton Hedman, Sound Engineer
Jackie Dennis, Wig Designer
Matthew McCoy/Cat Knight, Prop Designers
Richard Gutierrez, Wardrobe Master
Stewart Lyle, Technical Director

ORCHESTRA
Sonja Lindsay, Trumpet
William Berg, Woodwinds
Adam Hughes, Guitar
Kyle Wong, Bass
Dominic Moisant, Drums
Jon Gallo, Keyboard/Conductor


Sunday, June 30, 2019

Quantum Dragon Breathes Fire into Bradbury Classic

Fahrenheit 451


Dorian Lockett as Beatty Photo: Morgan Finley King

By Ray Bradbury

Directed by Sam Tillis

Quantum Dragon Theatre
Potrero Stage / 1695 18th St, San Francisco

Until July 7, 2019

By Christine Okon

In 1953, Ray Bradbury wrote the novel Fahrenheit 451 to first lament McCarthy-era suppression of free thought and later to sound the alarm about mass media’s threat to reading literature. Although Marshall McLuhan called television “medium cool,” Bradbury’s story reveals how easily everything that defines a person--and society--can go up in flames. It’s especially relevant today in a global digital world that displaces discourse with sound bites, soul searching for quick Google results, and logic with Twitter rants. Does anyone have time to think?

Quantum Dragon Theater (one of four theaters in the country dedicated to science fiction and fantasy theater) brings a tight, intense and profoundly moving production of "Fahrenheit 451" to the Potrero Stage. Sam Tillis directs a wonderful ensemble cast in Ray Bradbury's own adaptation of his novel, with the ending inspired by Francois Truffaut’s 1966 film version.

In the distant future, the act of reading books threatens government control and is therefore a punishable crime. To enforce the law, firemen are dispatched as needed to destroy books by starting fires. Don’t like a particular point of view? Burn the book. Upset by the emotions stirred by reading? Burn the book. Why not make it easy and burn every book? (Substitute “burn the book” with “block or delete” to see how it relates to digital life.)

Guy Montag is a fireman not quite happy with his job, or his life for that matter. Ron Chapman gives us a Montag who is a somewhat confused dreamer who drifted into his occupation without thought and is just now realizing how it consumes him. He’s challenged and intrigued by his bright and questioning neighbor Clarisse (Emily Dwyer) who has the fierce cunning of a French Resistance fighter. His mind sparked by curiosity, Montag goes home to see his wife Mildred (Emily Corbo) once again asleep on the couch; even when awake, she can communicate only in terms of meaningless TV shows and drugs. He begins to realize that something is wrong with this picture, and thus begins a shift in his blind compliance to authority.

Emily Corbo and Ron Chapman Photo: Morgan Finley King

As Fire Captain Beatty, Dorian Lockett brings us a remarkable, sardonic character who heightens ordinary discourse with literary allusions that fly over the heads of his underlings (Melanie Marshall, James Aaron Oh). Like many people, he had long ago taken the job of fireman as a matter of survival only to become engulfed in the dangerous mediocrity of its responsibility. Lockett delivers an amazing 13-page monolog to paint the story of a man who revered books before he was forced to forsake discovery for destruction, details over headlines, and prattle over discussion. He is a man in despair.

Melanie Marshall, James Aaron Oh, Dorian Lockett Photo: Morgan Finley King

Beatty smokes a pipe that emits the sweet scent of a glowing fireplace, adding olfactory enhancement to the experience. Smells are suggested in other scenes, as when an elderly woman (Annette Oliveira) presses her nose into a book as if it were a baby’s belly, or when Montag describes the rich odor of kerosene. Strategic lighting to suggest fire and screaming alarms add to the multi-sensory drama.

Montag begins to revere books as sacred objects when he realizes they are written by individuals. He moves away from his soul-killing work toward self-discovery with the help of old Professor Faber (Annette Oliveira) who quotes lines from books to Montag via a tiny earpiece. Montag’s resolve is rewarded when he encounters a renegade tribe of book-lovers who have memorized the works of Dickens, Melville, Dostoevsky and others to protect them via oral tradition, not unlike the origins of language itself.  Montag realizes he is home at last as he is welcomed by these guardians of literature, and there is a feeling of hope in the embers.

After turning off my phone before the play began, I was in no hurry to turn it on again when the play ended. There was just so much to think about, and the digital realm could wait.

"Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury, directed by Sam Tillis of Quantum Dragon Theatre at The Potrero Stage, San Francisco, through Sunday, July 7, 2019. Info: quantumdragon.org

CAST
Beatty...Dorian Lockett*
Montag...Ron Chapman
Mildred...Emily Corbo
Clarisse...Emily Dwyer
Black/First Paramedic/Helen...Melanie Marshall
Holden/Second Paramedic/Alice...James Aaron Oh
Hudson/Faber...Annette Oliveira
Aristotle...Crystal Why
Tolkien...Lucianne Colón
Dostoevsky...Christine Sheppard
Saint-Exupéry...Willow Mae
Carroll...Jacinta Sutphin
Plato...Omar Osoria-Peña
Melville...Ray Dequina
Stevenson...Abe Bernstein
*Appears with the special permission of Actors' Equity Association.

PRODUCTION TEAM
Director...Sam Tillis
Stage Manager…Annie Tillis
Set Design...Katie Whitcraft
Master Builder…Karl Haller
Lighting Design...Sara Saavedra
Sound Design…Larry Tasse
Costume Design...Marisely Cortes & Emily Dwyer
Properties Design...Miles Callan
Projection Design...Colin Johnson
Poster Design...Marisa Darabi
Promotional Photography…Morgan Finley King



Monday, June 17, 2019

A Rhino Walks Into a Bar...

Rhinoceros

Eugène Ionesco Drawing by George Chialtis

by Eugène Ionesco

Translated by Derek Prouse
Directed by Frank Galati

A.C.T.’s Geary Theater, San Francisco

Until June 23, 2019

By Christine Okon

If “fifty million Frenchmen can’t be wrong,” a whole town turning into rhinoceroses should be no big deal. Unless you’re Berenger, the only man who stands alone against a growing stampede of conformity in Eugene Ionesco’s absurdist classic “Rhinoceros” at A.C.T. until June 23, 2019.

Director Frank Galati has unleashed his Asolo Theatre production in San Francisco where it goes on a rampage of hilarity and surprise. Although the play is said to be inspired by Ionesco’s reaction to how quickly his supposedly intellectual friends embraced Fascism, “Rhinoceros” is a fun circus of puppetry, mime, clowning, vaudeville, and ingenious set and sound design where a huge rhinoceros sits upstage like, well, an elephant in the room and people react with shock, awe, or skepticism as the beasts take over the town.

Jomar Tagatac, Danny Scheie, David Breitbarth, Rona Figueroa, Teddy Spencer, Trish Mulholland
Photo: Kevin Berne

Berenger (David Breitbarth) and Gene (Matt DeCaro) are two friends in a somewhat dysfunctional relationship, where Gene berates Berenger for his drinking, slovenliness, and timidity while Berenger tries to keep hold of his sanity and dream of winning over his coworker Daisy (Rona Figueroa). It’s a joy to watch Breitbarth and DeCaro play off each other like practiced vaudevillians or dancers engaged in conversations that go nowhere. Using only his body, expressions, and voice, DeCaro masterfully sculpts the illusion of a man indeed actually turning into a rhinoceros while his loyal friend Berenger reacts like a concerned parent nursing a child with a fever.

Matt DeCaro and David Breitbarth Photo: Kevin Berne

The whole town is literally shaken by the onslaught of the strange, powerful creatures, and so is the A.C.T. stage as a rhino trapped in the basement bashes through the floor, howling and bellowing (thanks to Joseph Cerqua’s sound design). When a frantic Mrs. Boeuf (hilarious Trish Mulholland) recognizes her husband-turned-rhino, she reaches out to him and later rides off on a rollicking rump of amazing stagecraft.

David Breitbarth and Trish Mulholland Photo: Kevin Berne

Soon everyone is joining Team Rhino, with some gradually changing while others, like Mr. Dudard, played with geeky self-constraint by Teddy Spencer, take a huge leap of faith. And why not join the rhinoceroses? They are singing, having fun, being together. They’re strong and powerful. The only one who us not enticed is Berenger who exclaims “I will never capitulate!” By the end of the play, one wonders whether it’s worth it to stay a Berenger.

David Breitbarth Photo: Kevin Berne

Edith Piaf’s “Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien” ("No, I do not regret anything") is played throughout as a type of theme song, appropriate for someone who’s made  a decision one way or the other and resists change.

Rhinoceros” by Eugene Ionesco, directed by Frank Galati, at A.C.T. Geary Theater, San Francisco, through Sunday, June 23, 2019. Info: act-sf.org


CAST
David Breitbarth -- Berenger
Matt DeCaro --Gene
Rona Figueroa -- Daisy
Trish Mulholland -- Mrs. Boeuf
Göran Norquist -- Marcel
Danny Scheie -- Mr. Papillon
Lauren Spencer -- Collette
Teddy Spencer -- Mr. Dudard
Jomar Tagatac -- Mr. Botard

CREATIVE TEAM
Author -- Eugène Ionesco
Translator -- Derek Prouse
Director -- Frank Galati
Scenic and Costume Designer -- Robert Perdziola
Lighting Designer -- Chris Lundahl
Sound Designer & Original Music -- Joseph Cerqua
Vocal Coach -- Christine Adaire
Movement Coach -- Danyon Davis
Dramaturg  -- Joy Meads

The actors and stage managers employed in this production are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the union of professional actors and stage managers in the United States.

Thursday, June 13, 2019

The Unescapable Prison of Destiny

Oedipus El Rey

Sean San José and Esteban Carmona  Photo: Jennifer Reiley

Written by Luis Alfaro
Directed by Loretta Greco

Magic Theatre
Fort Mason Center, San Francisco

Until June 23, 2019

By Christine Okon

Sophocles’ tragedy about a hubristic king ensnared in a destiny that leads him to kill his father and marry his mother is the template for Luis Alfaro’s Oedipus El Rey, now in a 10th anniversary revival at Magic Theatre.

Brimming with machismo, afire with passion and rage, and studded with vivid (to say the least) urban Spanish idioms, Oedipus El Rey is a powerful journey of a soul traversing the past, present, and future in realms of the physical and mystical to reach a painful self-discovery. Alfaro weaves his own ancient and contemporary Hispanic roots into a complex tapestry of cultural beliefs, expectations, spirituality, and street-survival.

The play opens with men in orange prison jumpsuits shuffling in line. As the heavy gates slam shut, a power dynamic of cutthroat competition begins to play out among the men practiced in the game of survival. “Who is this man?” asks the chorus (Sean San Jose, Juan Amador, Armando Rodriguez, and Gendell Hing-Hernandez) who throughout the play voices ancient wisdom and admonitions of culture and spirit.

Gendell Hing-Hernandez, Esteban Amador, Sean San José, Armando Rodriguez
Photo: Jennifer Reiley

The man is Oedipus, a young and beautifully fit inmate who calls himself king. Esteban Carmona presents a visually strong Oedipus with an innocence that doesn’t quite project the ruthless toughness of a cursed man who has suffered his way to power. Oedipus has been protected from birth by the blind Tireisas (a wry and compassionate Sean San Jose) who alone knows the boy’s history and who has come to see him as a son. Because of Tiresias, Oedipus thinks above the fray enough to see himself as a king, and it is this attitude that locks him in the unstoppable train of destiny.

Gendell Hing-Hernandez, Armando Rodriguez, Esteban Amador,  Juan Amador
Photo: Jennifer Reiley
Once out of prison, Oedipus embarks on a journey to power, starting with a fierce standoff with another driver that ends in the fateful death of his father Laius (steely Gendell Hing-Hernandez). Fleeing from the crime, Oedipus finds a place with his uncle Creon (a tough and savvy Armando Rodriguez) who runs a “family business” with his sister Jocasta (played with a timeless sensuality by Lorraine Velez), the widow of Laius. “The dead can get into your head and make you stop living, even from the grave,” she says, in one of Alfaro’s many beautifully rendered lines. In blissful ignorance of their fated reality, Oedipus and Jocasta follow their palpable and vivid attraction into a deep and arousing passion that only heightens the devastating shock of truth.

Juan Amador, Esteban Carmona, Lorraine Velez
Photo: Jennifer Reiley
Throughout the play, the backdrop shifts like shadows on the cave wall in an evocative dreamscape of abstract and floating images. The square floor of the Magic’s northside theater, however, could be used to present more than static tableaux of characters interacting with each other.

Oedipus El Rey is about boundaries that, when crossed, can trigger deadly machismo standoffs as well as the wrath of the gods punishing the defiant, a reality faced all too often by those who must struggle to survive.

Oedipus El Rey by Luis Alfaro, directed by Loretta Greco, at Magic Theatre, Fort Mason, San Francisco, through Sunday, June 23, 2019. Info: magictheatre.org

CAST
Oedipus -- Esteban Carmona*
Jocasta -- Lorraine Velez*
Coro/Tiresias -- Sean San José*
Coro/El Sobador -- Juan Amador
Coro/Creon --  Armando Rodriguez*
Coro/Laius -- Gendell Hing-Hernandez*
*Member of Actors' Equity Association

CREATIVE TEAM
Hana Kim** (Scenic/Projection Design)
Ulises Alcala** (Costume Design)
Wen-Ling Liao** (Lighting Design)
Jake Rodriguez (Sound Design)
Amanda Marshall (Stage Manager)
Sonia Fernandez (Dramaturg)
Libby Martinez (Props Design)
Jacquelyn Scott (Tattoo Design)
**Member of United Scenic Artists local USA 829

Friday, May 31, 2019

Wordless Resistance to Oppression

Antiwords


Spitfire Company, Czech Republic
Inspired by Vaclav Havel's "Audience"

Directed by Petr Bohac

San Francisco International Arts Festival
Building D, Fort Mason, San Francisco

Until June 2, 2019

By Christine Okon

The artistic troupe Spitfire from the Czech Republic gained permission just in time to participate in the San Francisco International Arts Festival with their performance piece “Antiwords.”*

Inspired by Vaclav Havel’s play “Audience” about working in a Communist-era beer factory, "Antiwords" revels in the same absurdist, bird-flipping attitude that Czechs have always maintained under oppression. Menial work will get done, yes, but at a surreptitiously slower pace interspersed with much drinking, complaining, and peeing.

Two lithe, young women wearing matching drab pants, T-shirt and sneakers carry two large paper mache heads. As each vie to catch the eye of audience members, the pecking order is soon established as one is obviously more powerful, but over what? Both women put on the heads, don drab coats, and sit at a small table. They look exactly alike as Man #1 takes control by inviting the other to “have a beer” while Man #2 reluctantly obliges.

Again and again, a beer bottle is opened, a mug is filled to a heady froth, and the order to drink is uttered, because it is “the tradition.”  This action iterates ad absurdum, with the audience sometimes cheering “chug, chug, chug” as one of the performers lifts her mask to down the entire glass. (I was amazed at how quickly the actresses could polish off nearly a case of Pilsner Urquell.) In an environment where all is “shit” and nothing really matters, the only options are to drink or find a way not to, in other words, to comply or resist.


“Antiwords” is a quirky, delightful one-hour show of unspoken but powerful dynamics. The head masks are wonderfully sculpted to indicate an everyman capable of riding a wide range of emotions. The deliberate, practiced and expressive micro-movements of the two women animate each head, reminding me of Czech or Polish animation that tells a story with universal imagery and no dialog. "Antiwords" is physical theater at its best, with shifting power dynamics conveyed through slumped shoulders, shrugs, crazy dances (including a superb moonwalk) and reactive gestures.

Spitfire’s “Antiwords” ends Sunday, Jun 2. While you’re at Fort Mason, check out the other incredible performances from around the globe at sfiaf.org

* NOTE: The San Francisco International Arts Festival is keenly feeling the trickle-down effect of the US political decree that has stalled or denied visa approvals for some performing groups from other counties, leading to an unprecedented need for costly legal help. You can attend the free “Artist Visa Crisis Panel Discussion”  on Saturday June 1, 2:00pm, at Friends of SFPL Bookstore, Building C, Fort Mason. Info: https://www.sfiaf.org/theatre_power_democracy_panel


“Antiwords” based on “Audience” by Vaclav Havel, directed by Petr Bohac, at San Francisco International Arts Festival, Fort Mason, San Francisco, through Sunday, June 2, 2019.
Info: https://www.sfiaf.org/spitfire_company

Performers: Miřenka Čechová and Jindřiška Křivánková
Masks: Paulina Skavova
Lighting: Martin Spetlik
Music: Sivan Eldar, Karel Gott


Tuesday, May 21, 2019

A Love that Spans Decades


The View UpStairs


Chris Morrell, Cameron Weston, David Bicha, Gary M. Giurbino, Anthony Rollins-Mullens*, Coleton Schmitto, Jessica Coker, and Jesse Cortez. Photo: Lois Tema.

By Max Vernon
Directed by Ed Decker

New Conservatory Theatre Center
25 Van Ness, SF

Until June 9, 2019

By Christine Okon

The New Conservatory Theatre is celebrating 38 years as San Francisco’s center for LGBT themed theater, and its current production of Max Vernon’s musical The View UpStairs  brings that span of history to life.

In 1973, homosexuals were targeted, assaulted, discriminated against, and reviled by general society. But in the New Orleans French Quarter there was “The Upstairs Lounge” that served as a bar, meeting place, church, family room, sanctuary and “Some Kind of Paradise” for gays in the know. An arsonist’s attack destroyed the building, killing 32 and injuring 15, and no one was ever arrested.  The View UpStairs is the playwright’s homage to this bar, its patrons, and the sweep of gay history.

Cameron Weston, Anthony Rollins-Mullens*, Jessica Coker, Coleton Schmitto, and Nick Rodrigues. Photo: Lois Tema
The play begins with a dance party in a deliciously decadent room full of Christmas lights, a disco ball, and even a framed centerfold of a naked Burt Reynolds. Everyone freezes in place as director and NCTC founder Ed Decker steps up to welcome the audience to the party.

The stage darkens as a young man Wes (wide-eyed Nick Rodriguez) wanders the room and wonders why, in 2019, he bought this decrepit building that needs a ton of work. Suddenly, magically, the lights go up, the party resumes, and Wes, clutching his smartphone, joins the group of diverse characters who all welcome him. Is he “Lost or  Found”?

Anthony Rollins-Mullens*, Jessica Coker, and Cameron Weston Photo: Lois Tema

As with most time travel stories, the stranger from the past and/or future is baffled and amused by differences from the other era. Wes, who is used to interacting only through his phone via text, Grindr, Facetime, and hashtags, is not used to interacting face-to-face with people in real time. He finds more connection with the “ghosts” than with the usual 21st century faceless digital entities. Patrick, the handsome guy in orange bell bottoms that is drawn to Wes, scoffs at the need for technology. Vernon creatively compresses the arc of decades into the same moment, and we are right there with Wes taking it all in. What endures over the years are love, connection, and friends.

Jesse Cortez, Linda Dorsey*, and Nick Rodrigues. Photo: Lois Tema


Although not everyone had the same caliber of singing talent, some standouts are Coleton Schmitto as Patrick, the man who teaches Wes about real love. Jesse Cortez as the newbie drag queen who is lucky to have a supportive mother (open-hearted Linda Dorsey*) sings with sweetness and vulnerability. All of the cast members convey that The Upstairs Lounge was a real home for many, heightening the sadness of the tragedy.

Those who remember 1973 can see how far things have evolved and how precariously close we are to regressing, should certain powers have their way. The lessons of the past can give us resolve to move into the future.

The View UpStairs by Max Vernon, directed by Ed Decker, at New Conservatory Theatre Center, San Francisco, through Sunday, June 9, 2019. Info: www.nctcsf.org

CAST
David Bicha, Jessica Coker, Jesse Cortez, Linda Dorsey, Gary M. Giurbino, Chris Morrell, Nick Rodriguez, Anthony Rollins-Mullens, Coleton Schmitto, and Cameron Weston
* Member of Actors Equity Association

CREATIVE TEAM
Technical Director ... Carlos Aceves
Music Director ... Kelly Crandell
Choreographer ... Rick Wallace
Wig design ... David Carver-Ford
Production audio technician / Sound design ... Wayne Cheng
Costume design ... Wes Crain
Production audio engineering ... Taylor Gonzalez
Scenic design ... Devin Kasper
Fight choreography ... Kristen Matia
Lighting design ... Mike Post
Stage management ... Kaitlin Rosen
Props design ... Daniel Yelen

BAND
Guitar ... Khalil Anthony-Doak
Drums ... Tim Vaughn





Sunday, May 19, 2019

Bloodthirsty and Bespoke

American Psycho: The Musical


Patrick (Kipp Glass) and Ensemble Photo: Nick Otto

Music & Lyrics by Duncan Sheik
Book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa
Ray of Light Theatre
Victoria Theater / 2961 16th St / SF

Until June 8, 2019

By Christine Okon

Obsession with winning at all costs.  The need to be the center of attention and alpha male at all times. Ruthless competitiveness that wrecks the lives of others. Solipsistic grandiosity. Dangerous. Does this guy sound familiar?

No, not that guy. But close.

From the start, Ray of Light Theatre's production of American Psycho: The Musical  hurtles us into the late 1980s MTV-frenzied world of 26-year-old Wall Street investment banker Patrick Bateman, where appearance trumps substance, greed is good, and one’s purpose in life is to crush the competition at all costs. Underneath the smooth and suave exterior is a psychopath with bottomless bloodlust for getting what he wants and wanting what he can’t get. Like Showtime's serial killer "Dexter," Patrick manages to hide the monster behind a human disguise.

Patrick (Kipp Glass) on a "Killing Spree" Photo: Nick Otto

And with this premise American Psycho takes us on a wild and darkly satirical ride through the world of Patrick Bateman.

Inspired by the 1991 novel by Bret Easton Ellis and 2000 film starring Christian Bale, American Psycho: The Musical premiered in London in 2013 and came to Broadway in 2016 where it closed after only 27 previews and 54 regular performances, although it captured two Tony Awards for the projection design and lighting which inspired this current production directed by Jason Hoover.

Ray of Light has done great justice to the sadly underacknowledged music and lyrics by Duncan Sheik and book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and gives the audience one hell of an aerobic workout to an incessant 80s dance beat and adrenaline rush of fear. From the exquisite, precise dancers who recreate the technology-infused 80s to the top-notch singing, this production is as good as it gets.

We are thrown into the world of “what it means to be Patrick Bateman” as he does the “Morning Routine” that keeps him in lean, mean fighting form. Kipp Glass is the perfect Patrick, a mix of sleek disdain, inordinate self-assuredness, and designer-perfect looks. In “Selling Out,” he revels in how easily he gets others to buy whatever he’s selling. His supreme egotism is captured in “Not a Common Man”: “There are gods, there are kings / I’m pretty sure I’m the same thing. / Beyond boundaries, beyond rules...” Kipp is a sharklike pro who easily swims between his cool exterior to inner sadist.

Melinda Campero, Danielle Altizio, Desiree Juanes, Madeline Lambie, Kirstin Louie, Jill Jacobs Photo: Nick Otto

Patrick sees himself as the biggest and only star in a universe where others are mere satellites obsessed with looking good, and better than others, at all costs. In “You Are What You Wear,” the women prance around a party and flaunt their fashion choices: “I'm with Prada / I'm with Gucci / Missoni, Versace, / Which one is best? / The guys just buzz, / Do I look underdressed?” As Patrick’s self-absorbed fiance Evelyn who sees marriage to Patrick as a another prize to acquire, Danielle Altizio brings a convincing and shimmering shallowness to the character. Evelyn’s opposite is Jean (Zoey Lytle), Patrick’s executive assistant who holds an innocent love for him, seeing substance where Evelyn sees style. Lytle sings “In the Air Tonight” in a moving and mournful solo, and the more we learn about Patrick, the more we fear for her.

Patrick’s male coworkers are equally obsessed with appearance, captured in “Cards” where the choice of font and paper for a business card, that immediate indicator of power and status, is critical because “The question isn't what's in a name, but what it's printed on.”

Kyle Ewalt as Paul Owen Photo: Nick Otto

When Patrick finds out that his rival Paul Owen (Kyle Ewalt) not only wins the prized Fisher account, can get a reservation at the elite restaurant Dorsia, AND has a better looking business card, the inner monster flashes his teeth. When Patrick invites Paul to his apartment before both attend a party, both men dance to “Hip to Be Square” by Huey Lewis and the News, and Ewalt, all legs and arms, shows his moves like a Gumby-Michael Jackson machine. When Patrick raises “cutthroat competition” with Paul to bloody Grand Guignol, we are shocked just in time to take an intermission breather.

This American Psycho: The Musical features superb choreography (Leslie Waggoner), costumes (Katie Dowe), set design (Angrette McCloskey), sound design (Jerry Girard), lighting (Weili Shi) and video projection (Erik Scanlon), showing that Ray of Light is on its way to becoming even brighter. It’s an experience to die for.


American Psycho: The Musical
Music & Lyrics by Duncan Sheik
Book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa

Ray of Light Theatre
Victoria Theater

Until June 8, 2019

CAST
Patrick Bateman: Kipp Glass
Paul Owen: Kyle Ewalt
Tim Price: Matt Skinner
Van Patten/Ensemble: Clint Calimlim
McDermott/Tom Cruise/Ensemble: Julio Chavez
Jean: Zoey Lytle
Courtney: Kirstin Louie
Evelyn: Danielle Altizio
Mrs B/Svetlana/Ensemble: Anna Joham
Luis/Ensemble: Joshua Beld
Vanden/Ensemble: Melinda Campero
Victoria/Ensemble: Desiree Juanes
Sabrina/Video Clerk/Ensemble: Jill Jacobs
Sean/Ensemble: Spenser Morris
Christine/Waitress/Ensemble: Madeline Lambie
Detective Kimball/Homeless Man: Timothy Beagley

PRODUCTION TEAM
Director: Jason Hoover
Music Director: Ben Prince
Choreographer: Leslie Waggoner
Set Designer: Angrette McCloskey
Costume Designer: Katie Dowse
Lighting Designer: Weili Shi
Sound Designer: Jerry Girard
Video Designer: Erik Scanlon
Props Designer: Peet Cocke
Stage Manager: Lori Fowler