Wednesday, October 24, 2018

No Rest for the Weary

The Resting Place

James Carpenter as Mitch (Jennifer Reiley)
World Premiere
By Ashlin Halfnight
Directed by Jessica Holt

Magic Theatre
Until Nov 4, 2018

Perhaps you can recall a news story that has appalled you so much that you ask, “what kind of monster could do such a thing?” Then try to imagine that the monster has a family who, having had nothing to do with the heinous act, is nevertheless left to suffer the repercussions of shame, grief, loss, and love.

Such is the premise of The Resting Place, an emotional pressure chamber of a play that explores how members of a middle-class family, the Jacksons, each cope with the sudden tragedy of a family member who has committed suicide in the wake of public exposure of his repeated acts of pedophilic abuse.

Martha Brigham and Emilie Talbot (Jennifer Reiley)
Director Jessica Holt brings each character forward in his or her own struggle as they hide from the press and public in their home. Annie (Martha Brigham) has rushed home from a self-care retreat to be with the family and to mourn her older brother Travis. Although she has heard the “facts” of her brother’s behavior, she is intent on presenting the Travis that she thought she knew and loved: the decent son, fun-loving brother, and a good person. Her unconditional optimism seems out of place in the atmosphere of grief, anger, fear, sadness that has seized the rest of her family. Her mother Angela (Emilie Talbot) has numbed herself with alcohol into a state of detachment that could be mistaken for calmness. Her father Mitch (James Carpenter, in a volcanic performance) implodes with grief as he explodes with rage at his daughter’s obliviousness, and the arguments that ensue are visceral and disturbing. Macy (Emily Radosevich), Annie’s slightly younger sister, has had more practice holding on to her own sanity and provides some emotional balance to the chaos. Also affected is Liam, Travis’s former lover who was the last person to have heard from him.

Intent on planning a memorial service, Annie wants to creates a photo board of photos as if assembling a jigsaw puzzle of the Travis she remembers...but the the biggest piece is missing: how Travis has hurt and traumatized several boys. When Mitch brings home Charles, one of Travis’s victims who is now trying to piece his life together, Annie cannot bear listening and continues in her imbalanced denial.

James Carpenter, Emilie Talbot, Emily Radosevich, Martha Brigham (Jennifer Reiley)
In an abrupt set change, the rear wall collapses, furniture is moved off stage, and a simple podium is moved front and center as we, the audience, find ourselves uneasily attending the memorial service for Travis. As Annie begins her halting eulogy to her brother, she notices that Charles is taking a seat among the attendees. Why? Was Charles just curious, or was he forgiving his abuser? We too wonder why we are there. Annie is at last unnerved by the epiphany of the reality of what her brother did...are some acts irredeemably horrible? When she falls apart and shifts her tone, it is not convincing, however; her passionate conviction too easily dissolves into futile and helpless resignation. Nevertheless, she speaks her doubt to the listeners, and asks people to leave, knowing that there is no real place to escape or rest from the reality.

The Resting Place could have been tightened in many areas, and some of the characters’ actions seemed either pat or incongruous. Nevertheless, the swirl of complex emotions is intense, creating a visceral experience that will be remembered after the words echo away. Despite the connections in our life, how we deal with tragedy is personal and very lonely.



The Resting Place

CAST
James Carpenter - Mitch
Emilie Talbot - Angela
Emily Radosevich - Macy
Martha Brigham - Annie
Wiley Naman Strasser -  Liam
Andrew LeBuhn - Charles

CREATIVE TEAM
Edward T. Morris - Scenic Design
Sara Huddleston - Sound Design
Shelby-Lio Feeney - Costume Design
Wen-Ling Liao - Lighting Design

Dates: October 10 – November 4, 2018
Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.; Wednesday – Saturday at 8:00 p.m.; and Sunday at 2:30 p.m.

Magic Theatre
Fort Mason, 2 Marina Blvd., Building D, 3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94123

Tickets: Online: MagicTheatre.org
Phone: (415) 441-8822

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

All in the Family with Uncle Vanya

Uncle Vanya

by Anton Chekhov
translated by Paul Schmidt
directed by Paige Rogers

Cutting Ball Theater
Cuttingball.org
141 Taylor Street
San Francisco

September 21 – October 21, 2018

It’s hard to ignore the sleeping figure in his whitey-tighties slumped in an easy chair on the tiny stage of Cutting Ball Theater’s production of Anton Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya. As the audience settles in, a shapely woman dances seductively to La Chica Mamey as the man, Vanya, enjoys brief, sweet respite from waking life.
Before the play begins.. (Photo by Christine Okon)
It’s a delightful way to begin Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya, a play about longing, dreams, disappointment, frustration, and attempts to find love, life and joy within the confines of a country estate.
George Saulnier and Adam Magill - photo by Ben Krantz
The set is instrumental in fleshing out the characters. In its isolation, a country estate in the middle of nowhere is a type of cage, and the set design by Fred Kinney intensifies the feeling of entrapment. Two tall metal interlocking shelving structures, something that could be found at Ikea, extend the vertical space at opposite ends of the stage, allowing objects to be placed out of reach or walls to be climbed by desperate characters. On a higher shelf is a shiny samovar, and on the floor a rug, table and chairs. Two drop microphones are at either side of the stage, and they are gripped, swung, and nearly devoured by characters as they whisper or stress their lines, a brilliant technique to add emphasis and action to dialog.
Nanny (Nancy Sans) comforts Sonya (Haley Bertelsen) - photo by Ben Krantz
The estate’s been managed for years by Ivan “Vanya” Petrovich (George Saulnier, bringing a Wallace Shawn kind of openness); his niece Sonya (filled with desperate yearning by Haley Bertelsen); “Nanny” Marina (a fun and down-to-earth Nancy Sans); the innocuous and insipid Ilya Ilych Telegin, a.k.a. “Waffles” (played with a mousy near-invisibility by Merle Rabine); Vanya’s “Maman” (a cool Miyoko Sakatini); and the as-needed Hired Hand (Omar Osoria-Perla).
Yelena (Virginia Blanco) and Astrov (Adam Magill) - photo by Ben Krantz
The comfortable sense of order created by the routine of chores and meals at set times is disturbed by visitors: the pompous Professor Alexander Serebriakov (a distinguished yet whiney Douglas Nolan); his lovely young wife Yelena (played with sustained sensuousness by Virginia Blanco); and the uber-exuberant Dr. Mikhail Lvovich Astrov, who has been summoned to a futile mission to care for the professor’s myriad complaints of aches and pains.

This play about the yearning for lost “life, youth, and happiness” vibrates with the charged interactions among the characters, each brimming with his or her own desire to reclaim a fading dream. Director Paige Rogers has brought a sweet vulnerability to the characters, making this Vanya more modern and relevant in a way that really resonates with audiences.
Vanya (George Saulnier) and Yelena (Virginia Blanco) - photo by Ben Krantz 
Vanya is revealed as a man of fervent appetites that are ignited by the young Yelena whom he urges to “wake up to the pulse of her mermaid life” and hopefully take him along, while in truth she prefers to wallow “morbid with laziness” in ennui and boredom. Such dreams are impossible when there’s work to be done, and Vanya is left with the anger at living his whole life for nothing, at having to work hard for nothing, of letting dreams die. George Saulnier’s Vanya is a creature of habit, the lovable schlub who has put his dreams on the shelf as he exhibits an amazing emotional range from mischievousness to rage.
The restless Dr Astrov (Adam Magill) - photo by Ben Krantz
Also delightful is Adam Magil’s Astrov, jumping around like a bird distraught by the small periphery of his cage, restless with his visions and desire to make a difference. Astrov sees the future in nature but is dismayed by human beings ”who must destroy what they can never create,”  a sentiment that echoes our current woes.

Unrequited love, yearning, boredom, ennui, pretentiousness, fear/anger at aging, sense of urgency to flutter your wings before they are stilled forever: how can you not relate? The only reward for hard work is..rest. Which implies nothingness. And it is very sad that these people have only rest to look forward to. As the wise Nanny notes, “in 100 years, no one will care.”

This most original production of Uncle Vanya is simultaneously delightful and disturbing, fun and fearful. You’re bound to feel right at home.


Uncle Vanya
by Anton Chekhov

Cutting Ball Theater

Cast
Haley Bertelsen: Sónya
Virginia M. Blanco: Yeléna
Adam Magill: Mikhaíl Lvóvich Ástrov
Doug Nolan: Alexánder Serebriakóv
Omar Osoria-Peña: Hired Man
Merle Rabine: Ilyá Ilych "Waffles" Telégin
Miyoko Sakatani: Mrs. Voinítsky (María Vasílyevna)
Nancy Sans: Marína (Nanny)
George Saulnier: Iván Petróvich (Ványa)

Design Staff
Scenic Designer: Fred Kinney
Lighting Designer: Ted Boyce-Smith
Costume Designer: Alina Bokovikova
Sound Designer: Jaren Feeley
Properties Designer: Steffanie Dittbern
Associate Costume Designer: Ge Jia

Stage Management Team
Stage Manager: Michaela Byrne
Assistant Stage Manager: Eteya Trinidad












Tuesday, September 25, 2018

A Dark dirty butterfly at Anton's Well

dirty butterfly

Written by debbie tucker green
Directed by Robert Estes
Anton’s Well Theater Company
antonswell.org

At Waterfront Theater, 2020 Fourth St, Berkeley
Until October 7, 2018


In the play dirty butterfly, three characters living separately in a building with very thin walls share a psychic space that is electric with the dark energy of domestic violence.
Jesse Vaughn and Kim Donovan
Jason, a timorous, isolated neurotic with his ear glued to the wall, suffers from second-hand trauma from what he overhears. Amelia, self-contained and straightforward, chooses to protect her boundaries by trying to not get involved. And Jo, the victim of abuse, nevertheless resents the perceived intrusion of her neighbors until she is forced to take desperate action for her own survival.

Jesse Vaughn as Jason

dirty butterfly is an intriguing but disturbing and confusing study of the decisions we must make to watch, engage in, or ignore what others are enduring. Paranoia, rage, compassion and indifference both inform and spring from these decisions.

The minimal set suggests that no matter how we build our personal walls, we are exposed. The characters are skillfully brought to life by Mikah Kavita as the steadfast Amelia, Jesse Vaughn as the somewhat pathetic jason, and Kim Donovan as the abused victim Jo, but none is especially likable. All have British accents, but it is interesting to imagine it in American dialect.
Mikah Kavita as Amelia
Director Robert Estes is to be commended for bringing to light yet another relatively obscure play to Anton's Well Theater Company, taking on the challenge of unprecedented interpretation.

Seeing dirty butterfly is like passing an accident on the freeway: you’re curious and perhaps concerned, but what happens if you get involved?


dirty butterfly
Written by deborah tucker green


Cast
Jo - Kim Donovan
Amelia - Mikah Kavita
Jason - Jesse Vaughn

Creative Team
Director - Robert Estes
Assistant Director/Producer - Wm. Diedrick Razo
Lighting Designer - Bert van Aalsburg
Costume Designer: Helen Slomowitz
Sound Designer: James Goode
Stage Manager - Ayumi Namba

Photography: Jane Shamaeva


Thursday, September 20, 2018

Young Jean Lee's Existential Church

Church

Written by Young Jean Lee
Directed by Mira Morita

Crowded Fire Theater Company
September 13-October 6, 2018
The Portrero Stage, 1695 18th Street
San Francisco, CA , 94107


Say you have a friend that invites you to attend her church, and you agree out of politeness or curiosity. You go along, not knowing what to expect except the usual rote hymns, rituals and perhaps boredom. Then, SURPRISE!
Reverend Jose (Lawrence Radecker) preaches it

The unsuspecting audience, full of the charged anticipation of theater-goers, files into the small Portrero space where Crowded Fire is presenting Young Jean Lee’s play Church. The lights dim and everyone hushes up. We wait in the dark. And wait. Until we hear the calm yet unsettling voice of a man we later learn is “Reverend Jose” (Lawrence Radecker) who begins to tell us stories, stories that slowly chisel away to reveal our own insecurities, failings, foibles, weaknesses and pushes us to the brink of discomfort and possibly the Void.  Finally, to our sense of relief, the lights go up.

Nkechi Emeruwa, Alison Whismore, Jordan Maria Don, "Reverends"
We meet three women (Nkechi Emeruwa, Jordan Maria Don, and Alison Whismore), all designated as "Reverend." They exude a wild, contagious energy and fervor as they bring a weird sort of order with prayers of intention, the laying on of hands, the revved-up, roof-shaking shared experience. We listen to their stories even as they veer into the absurd and frighteningly graphic (perhaps familiar to many who were raised Catholic). The energy rises to maximum level, and we don’t know what is being believed but we go along with it, jumping up and down.

Invitation to the dance...

What’s the alternative? Twist in the winds of your own despair and meaninglessness?  Or believe, brother, believe? Raise your voice and rejoice, scream at the void, does it matter if you understand why? In his book The Denial of Death, Ernest Becker writes “Religion takes one’s very creatureliness, one’s insignificance, and makes it a condition of hope.” As more and more singers bound onto stage clapping and dancing to the spiritual “Ain’t Got Time to Die” in this "church," you have your own decision to make.

Church

CAST
Jordan María Don, Nkechi Emeruwa, and Alison Whismore as the Reverends
Lawrence Radecker* as Reverend Jose

PRODUCTION
Assistant Director: Nailah Harper-Malveaux*
Dramaturg: Sonia Fernandez*
Assistant Dramaturg: Isabelle Smith
Stage Manager: Rachel Mogan*
Assistant Stage Manager: Kitty Dacy
Scenic Designer:  Randy Wong-Westbrooke
Costume Designer: Alice Ruiz
Lighting Designer: Cassie Barnes
Sound Designer: James Ard*
Choreographer: Mark Allen Davis
Music Director: Min Kahng

*Crowded Fire Resident Artist

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

A Sparkling Diffraction of Stories and Spirit

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf

Written by Ntozake Shange
Directed by Elizabeth Carter
September 15-29, 2018

African-American Shakespeare Company
Taube AtriumTheater, 401 Van Ness Avenue

Ntozake Shange’s 1975 choreopoem For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf lives again in a remarkable new production directed by Elizabeth Carter that bursts, vibrates and sings its stories of loss, joy, pain, strength and most of all, resilience.

Natasha LaGrone, Bobbi Kindred, Tiffany Tenille

Seven unique characters are simply named “Lady in Brown” (Jan Hunter), “Lady in Yellow” (Tiffany Tenille), "Lady in Purple" (Bobbi Kindred), "Lady in Red" (Paige Mayes), "Lady in Green" (Brittany Nicole Sims), "Lady in Blue" (Natasha LaGrone), and "Lady in Orange" (Regina Monique). Each speaks the rich and musical monologue that is their story, each voice a thread that interweaves with the others to create a strong fabric of power and pride.

Tiffany Tenille, Jan Hunter, Regina Monique, Bobbi Kindre

This is a simple, elegant production in the newly restored Taube Atrium Theater, and the creative collaboration of the all-female cast and production crew is evident. The lighting design by Stephanie Anne Johnson subtly suggests a cityscape, and the set design (Randy Wong-Westbrooke) uses moveable frames for each Lady to act as portals, cages, islands, and personal stages for the stories. The minimal set suggests that it is the stories that endure, despite the time and place.

Paige Mayes and Tiffany Tenille

Choreographer Kendra Kimbrough Barnes taps into the rhythm of emotion that informs this play, adding depth to the stories. Especially beautiful are the sensual and flowing dances by Lady in Red (Paige Mayes) and Lady in Yellow (Tiffany Tenille).

After the show, a male audience member was moved to tears, saying “I didn’t know what women had to go through.”

Support from the sisters

Although created in the 70s, For Colored Girls... remains a classic celebration of the hearts and souls of black women--and all women---as they struggle to find and celebrate their voice.

Weaving the stories


For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf

CAST
Jan Hunter — Lady in Brown
Bobbi Kindred — Lady in Purple
Natasha LaGrone — Lady in Blue
Brittany Nicole Sims — Lady in Green
Regina Monique — Lady in Orange
Tiffany Tenille — Lady in Yellow
Paige Mayes — Lady in Red

PRODUCTION TEAM
Director — Elizabeth Carter
Set Designer — Randy Wong-Westbrooke
Lighting Designer — Stephanie Anne Johnson
Costume Designer — Nikki Anderson-Joy
Production Manager & Stage Manger — Leontyne Mbele-Mbong
Design Execution — Kate Boyd
Sound Designer — Lana Palmer
Choreographer — Kendra Kimbrough Barnes

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

West Side Story Still Keeping It Cool

West Side Story

Music by Leonard Bernstein
Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by Arthur Laurents; concept by Jerome Robbins


Directed by Erica Wyman


Hillbarn Theatre
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City, CA 94404
1.650.349.6411
boxoffice@hillbarntheatre.org


Until September 16, 2018


Reviewed by Christine Okon

Tucked on a quiet side street in Foster City, CA is a gem of a venue, The Hillbarn Theatre, now celebrating its 78th season with West Side Story, the perennial musical set in 1950s Manhattan and made memorable by the 1961 movie with Natalie Wood.

Directed aptly by Eric Wyman, this production shows that there is nothing like live theater to create a visceral experience made even more intimate by Hillbarn’s close arrangement of stage and seating.

All of the performances are solid, but the special gift is Ana Paula Malagon as Maria, with her beautifully trained operatic voice that fills the entire space with the spirit of the lovable and vulnerable young woman who is ready to open her heart to love. Maria is schooled in the ways of the world by the older Anita (Danielle Philapil) who brings a powerful sensuality that deepens the pulse of what would otherwise be a simple boy-meets-girl tale. The fierce duet of Anita and Maria ignites with the anger of "A Boy Like That," melting into the mutually felt truth of "I Have a Love."

Anita (Danielle Philapil) and Bernardo (Jorge Diaz) at the Big Dance
When Maria meets good guy Tony, sweetly played by Bay Area favorite Jeffrey Brian Adams, we believe in the power and possibilities of love, expressed beautifully in "One Hand, One Heart." Adams is no stranger to the difficult vocal range demanded by songs like "Something’s Coming" and "Maria," and his convincing connection with Maria makes us want to protect the young lovers from the harshness they are bound to encounter.

Maria (Ana Paula Malagon) and Tony (Jeffrey Brian Adams)

Kimberly Horvath’s choreography, in the spirit of Jerome Robbins, is innovative and sparkling: from the way the finger-snapping Jets slink together like a jungle animal on the prowl, to the beautiful pas de deux of dancers Angela Curatto-Pierson and Neil Rushnock as they act out the yearning for universal peace and place of "Somewhere," sung beautifully in a haunting solo by Danielle Chelken as Rosalia.

Ready to Rumble

The ensemble of Jets, Sharks and their women works great together yet manages to reveal distinct personalities that add touches of humor and contrast. Richard Ames plays a very likable, calm Doc, and Josiah Frampton and Jorge Diaz bring strong machismo to Riff and Bernardo, respectively. Detective Schrank (Marty Lee Jones) was sometimes hard to hear, and with the drab grey trench coat did not come across as the tough arm of the law. The live orchestra led by Rick Reynolds carried the score adequately, complete with bongos, although some of the woodwinds strayed a bit.

All in all, this production of West Side Story is “okay by me.”


West Side Story
Hillbarn Theatre
www.hillbarntheatre.org
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City, CA 94404
1.650.349.6411
box office@hillbarntheatre.org

CAST 

Maria - Ana Paula Malagon
Tony - Jeffrey Brian Adams*
Anita - Danielle Philapil
Bernardo - Jorge Diaz
Riff - Josiah Frampton
Doc - Richard Ames

Velma - Rachelle Abbey
Pepe - Armand Akbari
A-Rab - Luke Arnold
Minnie - Christine Baker
Glad Hand - David Blackburn
Officer Krupke - Shawn Bender
Rosalia/Somewhere Solo - Danielle Cheiken
Teresita/Dream Ballet - Angela Curotto-Pierson
Chino - Jose Gallentes
Baby John -Tucker Gold
Diesel - Tyler Harding
Schrank - Marty Lee Jones
Estella - Allie Lev
Anxious - Joseph Macadaeg
Anybodys - Katie Maupin
Luis - Carlos Nunez
Glad Hand - Randy O’Hara (opening weekend only)
Francisca - Fiona O’Neill
Pauline - Catherine Rieflin
Big Deal/Dream Ballet - Neil Rushnock
Action - James Schott
Snowboy - Jack Swartz
Consuelo - Catherine Traceski
Indio - Victor Valasquez
Graziella - Breanna Van Gastel

CREATIVE STAFF
Director - Erica Wyman
Music Director - Rick Reynolds
Choreographer - Kimberly Harvath
Costumes, Hair & MakeUp - Raven Winter
Scenic Design - Ting Wang
Lighting Designer - Pamila Z. Gray
Properties Designer - Phyllis E. Garland
Master Carpenter - Eric Olson
Sound Designer - Grant Huberty







Thursday, August 30, 2018

Boundaries Strained in Native Gardens


Native Gardens

Written by Karen Zacarias
Directed by Amy Gonzalez

TheatreWorks Silicon Valley
Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts
500 Castro Street, Mountain View, CA 

Until September 16, 2018


Even before the play begins, the set of Karen Zacarias’ play Native Gardens tells a story.

The backyards of two townhouses sit side by side. On the left is a neat, orderly garden and patio, with furniture, flowers, and grass arranged just so, suggesting that whoever lives there lives by the rules. On the right is a similar structure that needs TLC but it is appealing in its unkempt wildness, including an impressively real-looking huge oak tree overhanging the neighbors' yard. Big kudos to set designer Andrea Bechert  for an amazing feat of stage construction, with real mulch, flowers, and feel.

Native Gardens explores how we protect our personal spaces with protective but not necessarily impermeable boundaries, something that any homeowner realizes about the realities of property lines, laws and history.

Tania (Marlene Martinez) and Pablo (Michael Evans Lopez) visualize their new space
Tania, a young mother-to-be (played with earnest optimism by Marlene Martinez), emerges from the back of the shoddier house. she is soon joined by her husband Pablo, an ambitious young Chilean-American professional played with an earnest nervousness by Michael Evans Lopez.. Each is dreaming of what can be done with their new space: Tania envisions a native, pesticide-free habitat that will draw indigenous birds, bees and bugs, while  Pablo, in an impulse to impress his new boss, has invited the entire department over for a BBQ only six days away. After a moment of panic, the decision is made to have the party catered in the new yard which can be fixed up well enough except for the unsightly chain link fence that separates their space from the neighbors.

Frank (Jackson Davis) and Virginia (Amy Resnick) check out the new neighbors

As good neighbors, Tania and Pablo seek the approval of their established neighbors Frank (a composed yet finicky Jackson Davis) and Virginia (an inviting yet fierce Amy Resnick). The four get together in Frank and Virginia's yard, and usual chit chat unveils differences of opinion and attitude, as when Frank reveals how he douses his garden with pesticides amid other finicky actions to prepare for the annual garden competition, behavior that is anathema to Tania in sense of protection for the environment.

Tania and Pablo chat with Virginia and Frank
All four agree that the unsightly fence has to go, until good intentions are trumped by hard data when Pablo and Tania confirm that their property boundary legally extends into the neighbors yard--right through Frank’s cherished garden. This dilemma strains neighborliness to the breaking point, and suddenly the fence line escalates into a border dispute, creating fertile ground for humorous attempts to thwart the opposition. For example, Virginia attempts to cut down the beautiful oak tree, and Tania tries to keep peace within reason. Hilarious yet tense confusion and disagreement abound, masterfully directed by Amy Gonzalez, and the once-friendly neighbors lock horns until an event of life and death proportions puts property concerns in their perspective.

Virginia (Amy Resnick) and Frank (Jackson Davis) literally hold their ground against PO-Pablo (Michael Evans Lopez) and Tania (Marlene Martinez)
With a solid, well-crafted and fun script performed by top-notch actors, Native Gardens shows us how how our quickly-formed differences can dissolve  in the realization that we are all in this together.

Native Gardens
TheatreWorks Silicon Valley
Until September 16, 2018

Photography by Kevin Berne

CAST
Pablo — Michael Evans Lopez*
Tania — Marlene Martinez*
Virginia — Amy Resnick*
Frank — Jackson Davis*
Landscaper — Laura Espino
Landscaper — Mauricio Suarez

PRODUCTION TEAM
Scenic Designer — Andrea Bechert
Costume Designer — Noah Marin
Lighting Designer — Steven B. Mannshardt
Sound Designer — Jeff Mockus
Casting Director — Jeffrey Lo
Los Angeles Casting Director — Julia Flores
Stage Manager — Sara Sparks*
Assistant Stage Manager — Amy Smith Goodman*

*Equity Members